Clay Siegall is the Chief Executive Officer and also the founder at Seattle Genetics, which is a biotechnology company that specializes in the development of therapeutic target medicines for conditions for which the mortality rate has not improved.

Dr. Clay Siegall got his Bachelors in zoology from the University of Maryland and Ph.D. in genetics from the University of George Washington.

Since Siegall founded Seattle Genetics he has led the company into becoming the leading company in the targeted therapy field, developing the first antibody-drug firm approved by the FDA, now holding several approved medicines, in addition to generating a substantial portfolio of 20 drugs and a range of vital partnerships with medicine manufacturers like Bayer AG, Genentech, Pfizer, Genentech, and other companies.

Under Siegall’s control, Seattle Genetics has changed from just a small company to having a little research unit to the powerful player in the cancer research field it is today. Clay Siegall holds big plans for the future of Seattle Genetics. Having a expansive inventory of drugs in the process of development and an expansive variety of likely uses for the current medications, Seattle Genetics team is prepared to venture to the next level of drug development with full force.

In Clay Siegalls opinion, traditional styles of treatments for cancer like systematic chemotherapies, are getting close to their expiry. As for the more cost-effective and efficient targeted therapies which are being further developed, he thinks the methodology of the medical industries past will be replaced with targeted medication that is way more powerful.

Dr. Clay Siegalls enthusiasm for the medical field started with a lifelong admiration for medicine, and the future potential of using technologies and innovations to defeat illnesses. Clay Seigall first got into cancer treatments while taking a zoology class at the University of Maryland when a family member fell sick and the method of therapy used was overly severe. So much so, that they acquired serious anemia, and came dangerously close to dying from the chemotherapy.

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